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Select a size for your garden. Make sure there are no under ground power lines, gas lines, or water lines where you plan to till. Measure and mark the 4 corners of your plot with 4 stakes or 4 screwdrivers driven into the ground. Tie a carpenters string-line to one stake. Then pull the line tightly, and tie it around each of the 3 remaining stakes. This will create a box that you will use as a border reference line. Square off your plot with a carpenters square. Re-measure and adjust each stake to 90 degree angles from each other until you a have a nice rectangle. 
1. Remove or cut the 2 shortest string-lines. In this example they are shown in RED.

2. Use the longest 2 string-lines to guide your tiller in a straight line. shown in black

3. Till about 6 to 12 inches away from your string-lines so that you don't break them with the tiller.

4. When you complete your first tilling remove the remaining string-lines.

5. Leave the 4 corner markers in place as reference points.

6. Rake out roots and stones.  
Note. If this is your very first garden, then it will be safe to assume that you have not done any type of pre-garden preparation of your soil. This would be a good place for you to spread some granulated fertilizer. Ask your garden store which type will work best for your area or type of soil. Spread it evenly around the whole plot following the instructions. Then till it into your soil.  
-If you don't have a large tiller, set your till depth to 2 inches. Once you've completed the initial tilling, soak your plot well with a water sprinkler to soften the soil. When the soil has dried enough to walk on (it should NOT be muddy), Re-Till your plot. Repeat the process until you get the Minimum of 4 to 6 inches of depth.
-If you are buying a new tiller, do your home work. We recommend a tiller, with at least a 5HP engine and with an ability to till at least 6 to 7 inches deep. We like counter rotating tillers because they can break the hardest soil, dig deeper, and are easier to control.
Now that you have completed your 1st tilling and removed all of the grass, roots, and  rocks  you will have to Re-till your garden to a minimum of 4 to 6 inches deep.  The picture below is an old 5 HP rear tine tiller. The soil was very dry and hard so we set the tiller to a depth of 3 inches for the first tilling. Then we adjusted the depth to 6 inches for the second tilling.
Flip a bow rake with the tines up and use it to level your plot. Fill and level out any trenches or low spots that were left by the tiller. If you want to cover more ground and save a little time, you can remove the blades from the RowMaker and use it as a 32 inch drag to smooth out the soil. You can build rows right after tilling without leveling your soil, but your rows will look much cleaner and your planting will be much easier if you level out the ground a bit before you build your rows.
Your first 4 rows (your first pass), will become the guides for the rest of the rows. They do not have to be perfect, but the straighter they are, the nicer your garden will look. So try and make the first rows as straight as you can.
-The RowMaker works best on slightly moist to dry soil. Your RowMaker should pull with minimal effort and the     rows should form easily. If your soil is extremely lose and sandy, you may need to soak your garden evenly with a sprinkler set on a shower or rain setting to put some moisture into your soil. Then you can till your plot  again to prepare it for your rows. Your soil should not be muddy when you till it nor when you make your rows.

-Making straight rows will require just a little hand and eye coordination on the first 4 rows (your first pass).

-If you have great hand and eye coordination, you can start on any corner of the plot and “eyeball it”, and it will work ok!  BUT on the next page, we will describe the very best method that we found for making the straightest rows.
-Measure your plot at opposite ends to find the two middle points of the plot.  Mark them with 2 stakes and a string line. Starting on any end, place the RowMaker on either side of your string-line.
-Hold the RowMaker with both hands and pull with an even steady motion as you walk backwards. Keep the blade of the RowMaker close to your string-line guide as you pull.
-The wide handles will provide stability to help you pull at a comfortable pace. If you like your first rows, remove the line and stakes. If not, level out the rows and make them again on the other side of the line.
When you reach the end of your first rows, twist the handle and pivot the RowMaker while keeping the blade in the last furrow. You will be facing the opposite direction.  LEAVE ONE BLADE inside the last furrow that you created. That furrow will become your guide for the next set of rows. Repeat the process when your reach the opposite side of the plot and on all of your return passes, until you complete all of your rows.
If you are having trouble keeping your rows straight, place two blades into the last two completed furrows. The RowMaker will easily follow in a straight line because you will be using 2 rows as your straight line guides instead of one
-If the RowMaker forces a turn as you are pulling, there is a rock, a root, or a clump of hard soil that was missed by the tiller. You will need to pause to break this hard soil or root with a grubbing hoe or by running the tiller over the area again. Then rake, level, and re-make your rows.
-If your rows are not deep and well defined, then you did not till your ground to a depth of 6 inches or greater. The planting methods will still work, but your rows will not look as nice. Try tilling it again.
The RowMaker is made of heavy duty welded steel that was engineered with just the right weight balance to make 4 rows at a time, in tilled soil with minimal effort.  Additional weight is normally not needed.  However, the design will allow you to add two common 5 pound weight disks commonly used in free weights. The extra weight will help to make deeper, cleaner cuts in rough or heavy soils. Since you will mostly be using  your leg muscles, (the strongest muscle of your body), you will find that the RowMaker will pull easily in spite of added weight.  
If your rows are not deep and well defined, then you did not till your soil to the minimum depth of 4 to 6 inches. The planting methods will still work, but your rows will not look as nice. Try adding some weight and run the RM over the completed rows, or re-till.  Walk in the existing furrows rows to the right and left of the handle tube shaft
NOTE: The RowMaker is not a plow. It was not designed to break hard un-tilled soil. It is not a cultivator.  It cannot be pulled by machinery.
Walk paths are needed to plant seeds, to weed, and to harvest. If you have a fence around your garden, you will need a walk path around the perimeter. Walk paths are also used to divide long rows into crop groups. Or to section a garden into smaller blocks of different plant varieties. You can create a 14 ~ 16 inch walk path by raking down one row mound with a bow rake.  Below is day 32 of our 2014 Winter Garden. Walk paths are shown as yellow lines.
Medium Raised Mounds: With a bow rake, drag the soil of 3 mounds over themselves piling the soil over the center mound. It will take about 4 minutes to build a 20 ft. long medium size mound with just a bow rake.
Large RowMaker Beds:  You will need a lot of dirt so you must first till the soil 6 to 7 inches deep. Using a bow rake, drag the soil of 4 mounds over themselves towards the center furrow. It will take an average person about 10 minutes to build one of these mounds. No shovel or wheelbarrow is required.
The 2 large RM bed mounds  shown on the far right were built from four row mounds using just a Bow Rake. 

19ft. Long
7 to 8 Inches high
10 Inches wide at the top
40 Inches on centers.
April 27 2017.  Tomato plant experiment with RM Raised Beds.  
Two 10 foot long Medium Raised Mounds planted with a mixed verities of tomato seeds collected from leftover seed packages. The far row is one medium raised mound planted with icicle radish
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1. Remove or cut the 2 shortest string-lines. In this example they are shown in RED.
2. Use the longest 2 string-lines to guide your tiller in a straight line. shown in black
3. Till about 6 to 12 inches away from your string-lines so that you don't break them with the tiller.
4. When you complete your first tilling remove the remaining string-lines.
5. Leave the 4 corner markers in place as reference points.
6. Rake out roots and stones.